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is your plan for helping to bring the economy back to the way that it used to be in the '50s, '60s and '70s when there was a strong middle class, there was growth, there was real possibility in this country. >> brian, have you heard anything from either side right now that is ringing true to you as a small business owner, this is actually going to help me? >> yeah, it's really interesting. that's a great point. it's not just what the plan is but get the plan out early and stick with it. the big issue right now for small businesses like evelyn's, they don't know what's going to happen. so, you know, there's always politics in everything. and the democrats are going to be democrats. republicans conservatives. we know that. but what's the plan going to be and give my business or give her business time to plan. that's the big issue. we're serving these businesses all the time. it's the uncertainty. the health care debate is over. i'm just glad it's over. maybe it was good policy. maybe not. but do it early. that's the big issue. >> we talk a lot about uncertainty and people don't know what to
? >> if you go to the sba, they'll say you have to talk to a lender and talk to let's say u.s. bank or some other banks that do sba loans and then those banks will say, the most appropriate deal for you is let's say an sba called a 504 loan or there are certain products they'll recommend. so the sba will literally tell you to go to a bank. >> and that's the other thing. there are all kinds of products, not just one kind of sba loan. do you do that research ahead of time? or should you rely on the bank to steer you in the right direction? >> you should definitely do some research beforehand. or rely on the bank to steel you in the right direction. there's the 504 loan which are meant for real estate and fixed assets and the working capital loans sba 7-a loans which help with improvements and things like that. you want to make sure you're getting the right product for your business. >> if i could go through this process and get a non-sba loan, or an sba loan, is there a benefit to one or the other? i mean sometimes you have no choice but if you did have a choice? >> absolutely. one example is
to go talk to an sba lender and talk to u.s. bank or some other banks out there that do usba loans. the most appropriate deal for you, certain products they recommend. they will literally tell you to go to a bank. >> that's the other thing. all kinds of products. not just one kind of sba loan. >> do you do that ahead of time or should you rely on the bank to steer you in the right direction. >> do some research ahead of time and rely on the banks to steer you in the right direction. >> there are the 504 loans that are meant for real estate and fixed assets an the working capital that helps with lease hold improvements. you want to make sure you are getting the right product. >> if i could go through this process and get a nonsba or an sba loan, is there a benefit? sometimes you have no choice. is there a benefit. >> the sba 504, if you are buying commercial real estate, you can put 10% down, because there is less risk for the bank because the government is basically co-signing the loan. they are willing to go further, so the amortization will be farther out and you can put less equ
appreciate your perspective. >> great to be on. >>>s the frustrating for any entrepreneur. you go to a lender to ask for cash, fill out the forms and do whatever else the lender asks, and then your request is denied. it's a situation that's all too common. but you can't give up. as two entrepreneurs in maine discovered, perseverance can pay off. >> it was pretty flat out no at that point. look, we moved forward on this. now we're screwed. at that point we knew where we stood with them. >> joshua davis knows the frusation of being a business owner looking for funding. >> it was around $200,000. >> last year the coowner of the gelato fiasco needed a cash infusion so he and his business partner could open a second location. >> we decided the people believe in us and we believe in us. let's keep going and expanding. >> the number one question since we opened in brunswick is when will we open a location in portland? why haven't we opened there? >> neither one ever thought the search for funding for the retail and wholesale business would turn into a fiasco of their own. it took five months to expa
imported goods from taiwan and sold them in the u.s. everything from scooters to roller skates to yo-yos and the buyer's appetite was huge. >> sell me the product! sell me the product! so for me, it's real easy. because people come to you because a product was hot. >> the reason why the business did so well so quickly, initially, from the beginning, was because of melody's charisma and she has an absolutely great personality. and she is an excellent sales person. >> because she was so good at sales, and it was working, melody paid no attention to the other parts of her business. and that lack of knowledge eventually caused the company's downfall. >> we didn't really have an academic understanding of how businesses work. and didn't have a very sophisticated business model. so, of course, we ran into lots of problems. >> the thinking at asa products in the beginning, as seth chavez explained it, was just give me something i can sell and we'll make some money. >> and then you go in a frenzy to try to sell all that stuff. and so, when the trend dies, at the end of the day, you have a lot
people in the desert. move to where the food s. if you want to reach a certain audience, find out where they're at and be part of it. network like crazy. there's great ways, linkedin, facebook, twitter. there's lots of places to be able to get that opm, other people's money. >> the other thing about social media, you can throw it out there. if it doesn't work, nothing gained, nothing lost. >> that's part of it. for a guy in the architectural business, you know, twitter may not be the right place to go. i think understanding the context, where customers as partners are, and if to them. twitter, facebook, linkedin may be great sources. it may not be the only thing. he's got to think about the context before he lays out the cash. >> old school in this case. he needs to be hanging around engineers, homebuilders, and other folks that are in the construction industries. there's lots of chapters. the associated general contractors, the architects, engineers, land servers, they have local chapters. he should start playing there. >> networking to what you said before. >> always. >> let's move to
. >> we're just coming on to 500,000 kids that have been through it. >> wow. >> and domestically in the u.s. we're working on our national competition which will have, you know, having had over 20,000 kids who completed kids that co business plans. we'll bring the top 30 to new york, october 11th. they will compete. anthony won the new york competition. in new york, where we have been working, we have several thousand kids doing it. it's a full year course in their school. we start by learning about opportunity recognition. when anthony talks about having an idea of what the community needed and tried it out. we took him through the business plan. anthony, in that process had the opportunity, we work with thousands of volunteers. they have mentors. he talked about them as somebody who is a second father to them. >> you identify kids, teach them how to be an entrepreneur and connect them with mentors. do you have another network of teenage entrepreneurs you talk to? >> definitely. with the new start up, start up summer, which is a baby incubator type of thing. we found -- there was 16 of us.
, in the u.s. this year, we are working on our national competition which will have over -- having had over 20,000 kids that have completed business plans will bring the top 30 to new york october 11th. they will compete. anthony won our new york competition. in new york, where we had been working, we have several,000 kids doing it. it is a full year course in their school. we start by learning about opportunity recognition and that's, i think, when anthony talks about having an idea about what the community needed for his business and he tried it out. we take them all the way through the business plan process and they have a chance to compete. anthony had an opportunity to -- we work with thousands of volunteers. he talked about his mentor as somebody who is like a second father to him. >> you identify kids and teach them how to be an entrepreneur and connect them with mentors. now, do you have a whole network also of other teenage entrepreneurs that you talk to. >> definitely. it was actually pretty funny too. with a new start-up that nifty started doing last year, start-up summer, which
a vacation maybe. >> pretty much. >> the footsteps i wanted to hear. denise? >> owner of the s3 agency offered to re-do erica's website incorporating all of the new elements. >> this really has a modern flare to it so we call it modern rustic, because it shows you, again, a big picture up front and shows you a few aspects on the home page. you see that, but it has the book now. people want to have the easy book now. >> first impression? >> my impression is i like this one better and it's more exciting and more hip and modern. >> with the new web design chosen and the reservations and online system in place filling the rooms should take less effort, but what about the cottage makeover. what will erica think? >> let's get her in position. are you ready? >> 3, 2, 1 -- >> wow! wow! really cool. yeah, definitely. it's very different. is it the same bed? >> yes. it's a new head board. >> wow, so cool. that is neat. wow! you guys made that? >> yeah. >> that's amazing. you took the mirror and painted it and it looks so much spot. i would definitely say compared to where we came from, i would
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

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